For my Family

Day Two: Grateful for my Family

We humans are shaped and often defined by our families, for both well and ill. We can inherit everything–and anything–from our forebears, including any or all of those listed below:

  • Genetic vulnerabilities or resistances to diseases
  • Family recipes (be they sublime–or dreadful!)
  • Attitudes (political or otherwise)
  • Catchphrases (do you ever hear your parent’s or grandparent’s voice coming out of your own mouth?)
  • Childrearing practices (boy, can that be a two-edged sword! For you, and your kids!)
  • Knicknacks (from worthless dust-collectors to priceless heirlooms)
  • Traditions, (for holidays, special occasions, or anything at all)
  • Wealth (along with its entanglements.)
  • Poverty (different kinds of entanglements, but at least as many, here)
  • Or, all too often, dysfunctional patterns that over time can take on the likeness of a “generational curse,” if we’re not careful, thoughtful, and brutally self-reflective.

Blessings? Curses? A little of both? Yes. Families can be all of those. They even can be all of those at the same time.

If you regard your family-of-origin with little short of horror, I get it.

If you see them mainly as a pain in the patoot but you love them anyway, you’re in good company throughout most of the planet.

If you never knew them, I offer my deepest condolences–and pray you may be empowered to surround yourself with the kind of friends who love you like the most positive kind of brothers and sisters.

But if you’re like me, you not only remember your siblings and parents–you still have at least some of them around to deal with, care about, and/or worry about.

A bit rude, maybe, but more accurate than not.

In my case I have a house I have almost reclaimed from the hoarder-esque piles of inherited household goods after some eight estate liquidations since 2005, a recently-turned-93-year-old father, a Beloved who lost his 89-year-old mother this year, and two adult children with a variety of strengths and challenges–plus assorted canine, feline, piscine, and even Eublepharine household members with challenges of their own.

They are, in many ways, the reason I get up in the morning (well, them and the novel!), the delight of my life, and also the sand in my gears. I wouldn’t trade them for anything, and I know I’m incredibly lucky to have them. Every single one I’ve lost, I’ve lost under extreme protest. Every single one I haven’t yet lost, I cherish with all my heart.

IMAGES:  The “Seven Days of Gratitude” design is my own creation, for well or ill. If for some reason You’d like to use it, please feel free to do so, but I request attribution and a link back to this post. Many thanks to Boardofwisdom, via Your English Library’s summary page about About a Boyfor the quotation image from Manwadu Ndife, and to iFunny for the graphic about family being like underpants.

 

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jansgephardt

Kansas City-based Jan S. Gephardt is a writer, artist, and teacher. She makes nationally-recognized paper sculpture and writes sf mystery novels about a sapient police dog.

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