A view of flooding and devastation in Puerto Rico on the left and of the burnt remains of Paradise, CA on the right represent some ot the devastation that forces people to become climate refugees.

In your future, too?

The Artdog Quote of the Week

The more I think about this week’s quote, the more truth I see in it. This month I’m focusing some of my posts on climate change migration, and climate change refugees, because it is a growing phenomenon.

My fellow Americans tend to think of refugees as “other people.” But if you’re a Puerto Rican, or a former resident of Paradise, California, I bet it doesn’t feel so remote. Many communities in Alaska also are feeling the effects, but if you’re a Hurricane Katrina refugee, this is already an all-too-familiar story.

This issue isn’t going away, it’s growing. Proactive planning is by far the best response, but we’re not getting enough of that from most local, state, or federal agencies–although a few (too few) corporations are waking up to the problem. This is an issue right here (no matter where “here” is for you) and right now.

A view of flooding and devastation in Puerto Rico on the left and of the burnt remains of Paradise, CA on the right represent some ot the devastation that forces people to become climate refugees.
From flooding and devastation in Puerto Rico to burnt remains in Paradise, CA, there’s too much destruction on US soil for Americans to turn a blind eye to climate refugees.

If you haven’t already started, this might be a great time to write, call or email your representatives, government officials, and others. If you live in a representative democracy, you have the right! Show up at town halls. Demonstrate if needed. Make your voice heard, and remember performance records when you vote. We’re all in the bullseye, for this one.

IMAGE CREDITS: Many thanks to AZ Quotes for the illustrated quote from Vivienne Westwood. The other image is a composite of two news photos. On the left is a view of a flooded Puerto Rican town in the wake of Hurricane Maria, courtesy of The Daily Egyptian, photo by Carolyn Cole/Los Angeles Times/TNS. On the left is a view of destruction in Paradise, CA after the Camp Fire in 2018, from Insurance Journal (no photographer credited).

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jansgephardt

Kansas City-based Jan S. Gephardt is a writer, artist, and teacher. She makes nationally-recognized paper sculpture and writes sf mystery novels about a sapient police dog.

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