Nurturing creativity with art, animals, and science fiction

Tag: building the future

Our history goes way back–but also forward

The Artdog Image of Interest

I love the vision implied in the illustration that is today’s Image of Interest. Women’s History Month calls us to look at our journey: where we have been, certainly. What we have done, and how we have made progress, most definitely.

But the arc of history is long, and it has not finished its trajectory. We build on gains our mothers made. Our mothers built upon the work of our grandmothers. The line goes back, and back, and back. But it also goes forward. God willing, to our daughters, and granddaughters, and on.

We strive for ourselves but also for them. What new stones will they lay, what new bridges will they build, and what new vistas will they explore? It’s up to us to make sure they have the tools, the material, and the vision to keep moving forward.

IMAGE: Many thanks to Click! The Ongoing Feminist Revolution (some really good material on that site, for those interested!), a project of Clio Visualizing History. I hope you’ll take a long look and explore both! Unfortunately, I couldn’t find an illustrator credit.

Creating well

The Artdog Quote of the Week 

As with most of this month’s “Quote” of the Week posts, I found so many relevant quotes I couldn’t stop at just one, in my quest to explore thoughts about creating a better future. This week was no exception! I hope you’ll enjoy these combined thoughts.

IMAGES: Many thanks to QuotesHunter‘s great post of “20 Inspirational Quotes About the Future,” for the first and third quote images, and to Double Quotes for the Eckhart Tolle quote image. I’m grateful for all!

Taking it seriously

The Artdog Quote of the Week

If I want to improve my future, I have to do more than wish. Powered by dreams, I have to take the needed steps to make it so.

IMAGES: Many thanks to Quotefancy for the Jim Rohn quote, and to QuotesHunter’s great collection, “20 Inspiring Quotes About theFuture,” for the Mahatma Gandhi quote. I’m grateful to both!

Drill, baby, drill?

The Artdog Images of Interest

As I noted last week, this month’s theme is working toward a better future, and my Images of Interest for the rest of the month feature amazing places in the United States that are threatened or actively under attack. As long as they continue to exist, we can still fight to save them, even if things are looking bad at the moment.

The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is one such place that is under threat. Not immediately, but the Trump Administration has green-lighted the initiative to begin drilling there, so the process has definitely started. 

What kind of damage is that likely to do? That first link may have a dated lede, but the rest still applies. It’s also true that tundra “heals” after disruption extremely slowly.

ANWR is so enormous, no single picture can hope to capture its variety and beauty. It’s true that five won’t do it either, but I’ve tried to find a good variety to give a small taste of what’s at stake.

IMAGES: Many thanks to William Bonilla and Defenders of Wildlife for the polar bear photo taken in the ANWR; to Robert Salazar and Origami for an Interdependent World (what a cool idea!), for the photo of the famous Porcupine Caribou, a subspecies; to Peter Mather and The Wilderness Society for the lakeshore-and-clouds image from the refuge; to Florian Schulz and The Audubon Society for the aerial photo of the braided river, plains and mountains in the refuge; and to the US Fish and Wildlife Service for the photo of the mountain foothills. sloping down to a plain in the ANWR. I deeply appreciate all!

Dream-believing

The Artdog Bonus Quote of the Week 

What is the future made of? Many influences, but the best futures come into being because someone has a guiding vision to lead them forward. Where do we get our vision? We dream it. 

IMAGES:  Many thanks for these images to a great article from  QuotesHunter, “20 Inspiring Quotes about the Future.” I really appreciate it!

This square design features a purple, orange, and yellow background to set of a rectangular design by Jeffrey St. Clair. It shows a square design that is mostly orange, with purple, yellow, and black elements. Words surround it. They say: The seven principles: Kuumba: Creativity. To use our creative energies toward creating a vibrant community.”

Creative healing

The sixth day of Kwanzaa

This one is especially near to my heart: the principle of Kuumba, creativity! The only way to build a vibrant community is through the creative devotion of the people within it. Is there any community that could not benefit from some creative healing?

Just as the arts can help revive a dying neighborhood, so can applying creative energy build positive bridges of hope, where before there were only walls of separation. Our whole country desperately needs this kind of creative healing.

What better, more hopeful task can we set ourselves upon than that, this New Year’s Eve?

This square design features a purple, orange, and yellow background to set of a rectangular design by Jeffrey St. Clair. It shows a square design that is mostly orange, with purple, yellow, and black elements. Words surround it. They say: The seven principles: Kuumba: Creativity. To use our creative energies toward creating a vibrant community.”
Image by, and courtesy of, Jeffrey St. Clair. See Credits below.

Creativity Transcends Communities and Careers

There are very few careers or communities that cannot be improved with creativity. It is the driving force of innovation, the power that fuels important breakthroughs. Applied creativity gives us the capability to overcome obstacles and develop greater vision.

And where systems or communities are broken, creative healing is the force that builds them back best. We become “stronger in the broken places” when we harness our creativity for good.

On a square blue and gray background, this vertical design has a top and bottom section. On the bottom is a photo of Mae C. Jemison, the first African American Woman Astronaut, in the microgravity environment of the International space Station. She smiles at the viewer/camera while floating in midair, wearing dark blue pants and a yellow long-sleeved shirt with a NASA patch on it, surrounded by wires and technical gear. Above the photo, on a dark blue background, the words say, “Don’t let anyone rob you of your imagination, your creativity, or your curiosity. It’s your place in the world; it’s your life. Go on and do all you can with it, and make it the life you want to live. -Mae C. Jemison, First African American Woman Astronaut. Students at the Center Hub / Black History Month.”
Quote-image courtesy of Students at the Center Hub.

Creative Healing Scales Up

From personal improvement to mending conflicts in our communities to resolving divisions on the national or international stage, creative healing empowers us.

This square design has a green and red background to set off a vertical rectangular design by Emily Poe Crawford, Em Dash Paper. It is an artistic calligraphy project in green and red on a white background that says, “Devote yourself to your community around you & devote yourself to creating something that gives you purpose & meaning. -Mitch Albom.”
Design by Emily Poe Crawford, of the Em Dash Paper, courtesy of OhMyHandmade.com. See Credits below.

Where can you employ creative healing in your life and world today?

IMAGES

Many thanks to Jeffrey St. Clair via LinkedIn’s SlideShare, for the nicely designed symbol image and “seven principles” slide, to Students at the Center Hub for the Mae C. Jemison quote, and to designer Emily Poe Crawford of the Em Dash Paper and OhMyHandmade.com for the Mitch Albom quote.

Happy Hanukka!

I’ve been making an effort to acknowledge the winter holidays of as many traditions as I can on this blog this year (as a practicing Christian, I can get awfully Christmas-centered if I don’t watch it!)–so I am mortified that I brain-glitched on such an important holiday as Hanukka! I hope my Jewish friends and readers will forgive me. I shall try very hard to do better in the future!

Meanwhile, I wish you all the richest blessings of the season: faith, family, and a hope for the future.

May God grant you a sweet new year.

IMAGE: Many thanks to Wikipedia for the beautiful photo of the lighted Menorah, by photographer Dr. Gil Dekel.

To automate, or not to automate? Is there value to the human element?

A Glimpse of the Future 

Last week I took a first look at some of the jobs that have been increasingly moving over to automation, and a few that might see more automation and fewer humans doing the work in the future.

In some cases this might not be a bad thing. In other cases, the robots may not do as good a job as humans might. A couple of cases-in-point leap to mind: bank tellers and retail store checkers. Which do you prefer?

Love ’em or hate ’em (I know people who feel both ways), these machines seem here to stay.

I’m older than dirt, so I remember before they had such contraptions. I remember having to plan to get money before the bank closed for the day or weekend, and how you always talked with a human being before you could complete any transaction.

I kind of liked it (confession: I still don’t own an ATM card, out of security concerns. Planning ahead: it’s a thing.), but then, I live in the Midwest, where bank tellers and grocery store checkers are apparently friendlier than they are in some other parts of the world. I like to get to know them, in the fond hope that if someone they didn’t know came in and tried to wipe out my bank account, they’d question it. I feel quite certain my bankers at Kansas City’s Country Club Bank would. Thanks, guys!!

I also remember before there was a self-checkout line at the grocery store. I even remember before they had bar codes on the groceries (what a pain that was!), and you had to watch the checker to make sure s/he didn’t make an error or ring something twice that you only bought one of. Of course, now when the machine steals your ATM or credit card information, you have few ways of knowing, so is that a net gain? Depends on for whom, I guess.

There’s reportedly now a trend toward automating fast-food service, unfortunately driven in part by the industry’s resistance to paying its employees a living wage. I can see how an automatic timer to pull the fries out of the hot oil at the penultimate moment might be a good thing, but completely removing all or most of the people? That’s a farther stretch for me.

You see, we’ve actually had automated fast-food delivery for a long time. They’re called vending machines, and they aren’t actually noted for their-high quality products or their ambiance.

Granted, Mickey D’s isn’t long on “ambience” either, but I kind of like to chit-chat with the smiling teens or senior citizens at the counter. Call me weird, but I prefer dealing with people, over figuring out the interface on yet another dang gadget. I’ve kinda perfected the human interface, at least to some extent, and I have this weird notion that people should be respected, even when they have low-end jobs.

An automated fast-food “restaurant” looks an awful lot like a glorified vending machine to me.

As I see it, the whole key should be playing to strengths. Robots and automation do some things way better than people. Business Insider interviewed Ryan Calo, a professor at University of Washington School of Law with expertise in robotics, who said, “For a long time, artificial intelligence has been better than us at highly structured, bounded tasks.” All of the applications we’ve looked at so far in both this and the previous post on this topic have been in that category.

Calo thinks, however, that robots are now, or soon will be, capable of moving beyond “the three D’s: dangerous, dirty, and dull.” It’s a fine line to define (sorry for the rhyme), so where do we draw it? If robots and automation can lift us beyond those “dangerous, dirty, and dull tasks,” isn’t that a net gain? I think it definitely is. If they can ever design a Roomba that cleans the potty, I’m all in!

Ivan Fourie encountered this friendly store clerk in Kyoto 2006, and immortalized her in a photo.

But people right now (and for millennia) do/have done way better at some things than robots and automation have managed so far. The determination to push automation/artificial intelligence beyond those basic limits won’t stop. (we’re talking about humans with an intellectual challenge. Of course they’ll pursue it as far as they can).

But just as industry doesn’t want to talk about the full cost of their initiatives (including environmental and human damage), so the people involved in the “second machine age” don’t want to talk about ALL the costs of their initiatives.

Are these Chinese robots cute enough to be worth their cost in human devaluation? Are they worth the effort of putting “friendly store clerk” and her siblings all over the world into financial devastation?

Would their AIs put good people out of work that they need? Don’t we all need people who are a positive part of their community? The friendly 7-Eleven clerk who brightens our morning? The bank teller who keeps our accounts safe? The shopkeeper who grows her small business locally? The first-generation immigrant family who runs the gas station? The custodian who keeps the school clean and well-maintained?

What’s the human cost of the fancy machines? Do they make life better for the humans in the community, or only for the corporations running the businesses?

I think we’re at a crossroads, in our contemporary life. We can look globally at ALL the costs of the decisions we take, or we can keep on looking only at money in a system skewed to ignore some of the most important costs of all.

Our choice.

Our future.

IMAGES: Many thanks to Before it’s News for the future-vision graphic. The photo of the Safeway self-checkout is courtesy of WonderHowTo, and the photo of the ATM machine is from The Northeast Today; many thanks to both of you! The cynical minimum wage meme is from Ron Paul’s “Liberty Report.” Your thanks is that I acknowledged where it came from, dude. You certainly illustrated my point, anyway. Many thanks to NPR’s “All Tech Considered” for the photo of the automated fast-food restaurant. I am grateful to Ivan Fourie’s Flickr Photostream for the the friendly store clerk’s photo. Many thanks to Business Insider for the photo of the Chinese food service robots.

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