Nurturing creativity with art, animals, and science fiction

Tag: Past visions of the future

1957’s Monsanto House of the Future at Disneyland

The Artdog Image of Interest

Today’s opening video offers a short (approximately 1-minute) glimpse of what was once a famous part of Disney’s “Tomorrowland” at the Disneyland theme park in Anaheim, CA.

The video clip offers a sampling from a much longer videofor viewers in a hurry. Below I’ve embedded what seems like a much more complete version, which is not quite 13 minutes long, for those who have time to view it.

Created by Monsantolargely as a way of showcasing innovations made possible by synthetic materials used in home construction, the longer video goes into considerable detail about using man-made materials all over the house.

Although the “House of the Future” has since been demolished and the original Tomorrowland looks like a campy, mid-century “retro” future today, many of its predictions have indeed become true. We do cook with microwaves now, and our homes are filled with synthetics. Of course, in 1957 no one was thinking or talking about potential risks, especially to firefighters.

My Images of Interest in October have all been videos drawn from a panel discussion, “Yesterday’s Tomorrow,” moderated by Kathryn Sullivan, in which I participated at FenCon XV. I shared these videos with the audience, and they generated enough interest that I thought my blog-readers might like them too!

VIDEOS: many thanks to YouTube and The Associated Press for the shorter video, as well as YouTube again and David Oneal‘s Extinct Attractions for the longer one.

What GM predicted in 1956 for futuristic cars of 1976

The Artdog Image of Interest 

In my research of videos about past views of the future, I wasn’t surprised to find that futuristic cars formed a favorite category. The one I’ll share today doesn’t feature any flying cars, but I still think you may enjoy seeing what General Motors did (and did not) predict. It also represents a category of “musical production long-form commercial videos” from the period, of a sort we don’t see much, today.

As ever, the assumptions about gender roles, and the extreme “whiteness” of all people in the video, speak volumes about the culture of the time.

My Images of Interest in October are videos, all of them drawn from a panel discussion, “Yesterday’s Tomorrow,” moderated by Kathryn Sullivan, in which I participated at FenCon XV. I shared these videos with the audience, and they generated enough interest that I thought my blog-readers might like them too!

VIDEO: many thanks to YouTube and CBS Sunday Morning for this video.

A 1940s-50s vision of a future kitchen

The Artdog Image of Interest 

When I was researching videos of ways the past viewed the possibilities of the future, I found that most seemed to fall into repeated categories. Futuristic kitchens (especially as envisioned by contemporary makers of kitchen appliances, imagine that!) formed a major subcategory.

Oddly enough, the makers of these videos rarely envisioned men as the ones who’d be cooking. Here’s a classic “future kitchen” from sometime in the 1940s-50s:

My Images of Interest in October are videos, all of them drawn from a panel discussion, “Yesterday’s Tomorrow,” moderated by Kathryn Sullivan, in which I participated at FenCon XV. I shared these videos with the audience, and they generated enough interest that I thought my blog-readers might like them too!

VIDEO: many thanks to YouTube and Susan Pine for this video! 

How did the future look in the 1920s?

The Artdog Image of Interest 

My Images of Interest in October are videos, all of them drawn from a panel discussion, “Yesterday’s Tomorrow,” moderated by Kathryn Sullivan, in which I participated at FenCon XV. I shared these videos with the audience, and they generated enough interest that I thought my blog-readers might like them too!

I’ll start with one from the 1920s.

VIDEO: Many thanks to YouTube and Aaron1912 for this video!

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén