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Tag: wisdom

11 Empowering Goddesses

The Artdog Image of Interest

I found an infographic that seemed appropriate for rounding out my collection of Women’s History Month miscellania: a collection of Eleven Empowering Goddesses, from Invaluable’s “In Good Taste” blog. The article that goes along with it is quite informative, too.

Whether you choose to worship these deities or simply find them interesting, even inspiring symbols of some of the strengths found within women, I hope you’ll enjoy the infographic.

This is an infographic titled "ll Empowering Goddesses to invoke creativity and passion." The subtitle reads, "These inspiring goddesses reflect the power & perspective necessary to tackle any obstacle that shields you from creative achievements."
The following material includes pictures of each goddess with some information about her.
Saraswati, Hindu. Goddess of knowledge, music, art, wisdom, and learning. Symbols and features: lotus or peacock, white sari, vina (musical instrument), crescent moon, four arms. Everyday Wisdom: Call up on her to free you of lethargy and ignorance, and restore a flow of wisdom within your career, artistic ventures, or daily life.
Hera, Greek. Goddess of: Marriage, life, and love, "Queen of the Gods." Symbols and features: scepter, diadem, pomegranate. Everyday wisdom: Overcome hardships and prove to yourself that you have the ability to take back control and tell your own story.
Seshat, Egyptian. Goddess of: wisdom, knowledge, and writing. Symbols and features: reed pen, palm stem, papyrus scroll, 7-pointed star, leopard skin robe. Everyday wisdom: Draw inspiration from Seshat when you're hitting a creative or writing block, as this patroness of writing pioneered many artistic endeavors.
Diana, Roman. Goddess of: the hunt, the moon, and nature. Symbols and features: bow and arrow, hunting dog, crescent moon. Everyday wisdom: Grasp strength from Diana's hunting spirit to advocate for your own dreams.
Hathor, Egyptian. Goddess of: joy, music, and motherhood. Symbols and features: sistrum (musical instrument), Ankh, horns and sun disk, blue lotus, cow. Everyday wisdom: rekindle your physical and psychological well-being and restore joy.
Kuan Yin (Guanyin), Buddhist. Goddess of: compassion. Symbols and features: white lotus, willow branch, vase, dove, book or scroll of prayers, rosary, sweet cakes. Everyday wisdom: Dedicated to relieving suffering in the world, Kuan Yin can embolden in times of fear. Draw confidence from her powers to step out of your comfort zone.
Freya (Freyja), Norse. Goddess of: Love and fertility. Symbols and features: Viking helmet, sword, cloak of falcon feathers. Everyday wisdom: Freya's fierceness and passion for education will inspire you to pursue your own passions in life, love, and the arts.
Athena, Greek. Goddess of: wisdm, courage, the arts, and skill. Symbols and features: owl, olive tree, snake, armor. Everyday wisdom: Call upon Athena to restore your poise and courage. As a lover of the arts, this important goddess can help you regain focus and utilize your surroundings to succeed.
Brigid, Celtic. Goddess of: fire, poetry, healing, childbirth, and unity. Symbols and features: fire, lambs, entwined serpents, St. Brigid's cross. Everyday wisdom: Brigid's healing capabilities may inspire you to express yourself through a creative outlet, especially poetry (her strong suit).
Inanna, Sumerian. Goddess of: love and procreation; "Queen of Heaven." Symbols and features: hook-shaped twisted knot of reeds, rosette, lions, doves. Everyday wisdom: Inanna's journey to the underworld was harrowing, but it parallels many everyday struggles. Call upon her courage and prowess to overcome barriers in your own life.
Nike, Greek. Goddess of: victory. Symbols and features: shield, wings, laurel wreath, palm branch. Everyday wisdom: Representing triumph and victory, Nike's strength will guide you to successfully execute even the loftiest of goals. At the bottom of the infographic is the sponsoring organization's name: Invaluable.

IMAGE: Many thanks to Invaluable’s “In Good Taste” blog, for this infographic.

Remembered at the end of the day

The Artdog Quote of the Week

On Saturday I made the point that “whether you celebrate ChristmasHanukkahThe Winter SolsticeBrumaliaYuleKwanzaaFestivusBoxing Day, or anything else, it’s likely you’re [giving] presents in December.” Gift-giving is at the heart of many cultural traditions in December, and (partially, but) not only because a large segment of our economy depends on it.

Even the best material gifts are only the outward symptom of an inner state, or they are meaningless. When the inner joy is stripped away, all we have left is an ugly exercise in greed.

Gordon Gekko was wrong. There’s a reason why greed is one of the Seven Deadly Sins, and it’s because ultimately it is bad for us: bad in fundamental ways that wisdom instinctively knows, but we often do our best to ignore. Listen to the voice of the wisdom within you. Hold it close to your heart this holiday season, if you want to seek the truest joys.
IMAGE: Many thanks to Suzi Istvan, on the Splendidly Curious blog. 

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